Fukushima Exclusion Zone Photos- 4 Years Later

View from the local primary school at Namie, 900 feet from the ocean (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

View from the local primary school at Namie, 900 feet from the ocean (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

Fukushima Exclusion Zone Photos- 4 Years Later

On Friday, 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and subsequent major tsunami struck Japan with devastating force. Along with the damage from strong seismic action, flooding, and winds, the inadequately prepared Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex suffered multiple meltdowns in the following days.

Recently, photographer Arkadiusz Podniesinski returned to the restricted zone, capturing and annotating the changes in the region. Reclamation crews have been busy, removing debris and replacing ruined structures. Contaminated topsoil is being laboriously removed.

 

Reclamation crews repair damage to buildings in the Fukushima exclusion zone (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

Reclamation crews repair damage to buildings in the Fukushima exclusion zone (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

In some places,  Nature has beat humans to the punch, and vegetation encroaches on human landscapes. The earthquake’s effects on the land are raw and dramatic; cattle graze placidly near open cracks in the earth from the quake. Flood debris still leaves visible paths marking where the tsunami receded.

Nature begins to erase evidence of human activity inside the Fukushima exclusion zone (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

Nature begins to erase evidence of human activity inside the Fukushima exclusion zone (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

Cattle graze near a crack from the Tohoku earthquake, Fukushima exclusion zone (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

Cattle graze near a crack from the Tohoku earthquake, Fukushima exclusion zone (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

Schools, stores, and homes were abandoned in the aftermath of the events. Podniesinski found buildings still standing as they were left, with store goods, school computers, etc., untouched.

There is a haunted quality to these photos, of life interrupted and abandoned. Silence reigns now where the bustle of activity was once heard. Perhaps the eeriest sign of this is a photo from Namie. The town has been deserted since the disaster, but the streetlights in the town still turn on at dusk every evening, as if they are waiting for the inhabitants to return.

 

Namie has been deserted since the Fukushima disaster, but its streetlights still turn on every night (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

Namie has been deserted since the Fukushima disaster, but its streetlights still turn on every night (A. Podniesinski/Disclose.tv)

When do you think the residents of Fukushima will return home, if ever? How should the reclamation of the district be handled? Join in the discussion! Comment below, share this on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter (#DMTalk)!

Staff Writer

Leo Ashcraft

A retired broadcast engineer, talk show host, news reporter - I have done everything there is to do in the radio broadcast business. I worked a year in television. I left that as my true passion has always been radio - plus I got tired of hearing - you have a face for radio.. I hope you enjoy my articles! Be sure to share them excessively on facebook - like our page and bug your friends with invites!

You may also like...

Leave a Reply